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31 Jan 2019

Insider 34: Can the NEM Survive More Renewables?

There remains a popular perception that a high level of renewables in the National Electricity Market (NEM) necessarily implies unreliability. In this article Hugh Bannister explores this notion by building up a plausible plant development strategy from the ground up; then trying to improve it.

Insider 34: Can the NEM Survive More Renewables?

There remains a popular perception that a high level of renewables in the National Electricity Market (NEM) necessarily implies unreliability.  In this article Hugh Bannister explores this notion by building up a plausible plant development strategy from the ground up; then trying to improve it.  The backbone of such a strategy is gas plant to provide reliability.  Renewable energy can then be used to lower operating costs, mainly fuel.

The article explores the limits to renewable energy penetration and what will be needed to relieve those limits, at least in part.

The article also touches on the issue of energy security.  The NEM is posing new challenges for AEMO to maintain security – the ability of the system to continue operating satisfactorily when disturbed.  While AEMO has a system security work program underway, the need to find robust long term solutions is becoming ever more urgent, as highlighted in the final report of the 25 August 2018 system incident.

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24 Oct 2018

Insider 33: The Failed NEM and How to Fix It

In this opiniated piece, IES CEO, Hugh Bannister, gives his perspective on how the National Electricity Market (NEM) got to be in such poor shape.

Insider 33: The Failed NEM and How to Fix It

In this opiniated piece, IES CEO, Hugh Bannister, gives his perspective on how the National Electricity Market (NEM) got to be in such poor shape.   Heavy handed government intervention is the evidence of that failure, but the article argues that it is persistent and wilful government failure in the administration and regulation of the NEM that has led inexorably to its current sorry state.

While popular debate rightly focusses on the renewable energy as posing a challenges for system security and reliability, the drivers for high retail prices are many and varied, and very little to do with renewables.  At the core, though, is a philosophy that has sought to profit from privatising the industry without putting in place arrangements that would ensure success from the consumer’s perspective.

 Hugh concludes the paper with a 9 Point Plan for recovery.  The details of what a recovery might look like require further discussion and debate.  This challenge will be taken up in future Insiders.

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23 Mar 2018

Insider 32: Understanding the Evolving NEM

This article describes how the IES electricity market forecasting tool, known as PROPHET, is used to model the National Electricity Market (NEM). PROPHET generates long term projections of wholesale electricity prices and dispatched generator outputs.

Insider 32: Understanding the Evolving NEM

This article describes how the IES electricity market forecasting tool, known as PROPHET, is used to model the National Electricity Market (NEM). PROPHET generates long term projections of wholesale electricity prices and dispatched generator outputs. Dispatch modelling can be used to investigate many uncertainties facing the NEM of the future, such as:

  • How will additional coal generator retirements impact wholesale prices?
  • To what extent will energy and pumped water storage participate in the evolving NEM?
  • How will the energy produced from photovoltaic (PV) sources impact the wholesale price in the middle of the day?
  • Will new transmission interconnectors lower wholesale prices?

Understanding the evolving NEM has never been more important for market participants, investors and policy makers.

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26 Jun 2017

Insider 29: Will Finkel Fix the NEM?

IES CEO, Hugh Bannister, takes a look at a key recommendation of the Finkel panel and a few critical things the panel did not address.

Insider 29: Will Finkel Fix the NEM?

The National Electricity Market is facing its greatest crisis since inception.  Everything seemed to be going swimmingly until a few years ago, when the cracks started showing.  In the last twelve months it has morphed into a full blown disaster.

So what went wrong?  Was this great enterprise to create markets out of monopolies destined to fail?  Is the NEM market design so rickety that it needs a complete re-design?  If so, what should it look like?  Or does it just need a cosmetic makeover, with a few additional layers of rules, regulations and oversight boards, which is how the Finkel report can be interpreted?

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26 Apr 2017

Insider 28: Does Snowy Hydro 2.0 Stack Up?

This edition of IES Insiders considers the economic viability of the "Snowy Hydro 2.0" proposal by making a comparison to the existing Snowy pumped hydro scheme, known as Tumut 3.

Insider 28: Does Snowy Hydro 2.0 Stack Up?

The Federal Government recently announced a proposed expansion of Snowy Hydro’s electricity generating capacity by 2,000 MW at a cost of $2 billion.

Is this proposed pumped hydro scheme likely to be economically viable? Pumped hydro projects move water uphill before releasing it and relying on gravity to drive a generator.

A comparison is made to the operating activity of the existing Tumut 3 scheme and includes a consideration of wholesale prices, water usage, and equipment efficiencies.

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21 Feb 2017

Insider 27: How to Break the Electricity Impasse (in your dreams)

In this edition of Insiders, you can read IES CEO Hugh Bannister's advice and comments on what should be done with East Coast Australian electricity market.

Insider 27: How to Break the Electricity Impasse (in your dreams)

In this edition of Insiders, you can read IES CEO Hugh Bannister's advice and comments on what should be done with East Coast Australian electricity market.

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08 Nov 2016

Insider 26: How will the Hazelwood closure impact the NEM?

This edition of IES Insiders investigates the impact of the 1,600 MW Hazelwood Power Station withdrawing from the National Electricity Market (NEM).

Insider 26: How will the Hazelwood closure impact the NEM?

This edition of IES Insiders investigates the impact of the 1,600 MW Hazelwood Power Station withdrawing from the National Electricity Market (NEM). We assessed the market changes in terms of dispatched electricity, greenhouse gas emissions, power flows across interstate transmission lines, and the revenue impacts to each main type of generator. We also examined the changes to regional wholesale spot prices and how this will affect household electricity costs.

To read this article, please download the PDF version from the link below.

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11 Oct 2016

Insider 25: Can Energy Storage Provide Dispatchable Renewables?

This edition of Insiders investigates whether it would be economically viable for large lithium-ion batteries to store electricity generated from wind and large PV sources.

Insider 25: Can Energy Storage Provide Dispatchable Renewables?

This edition of Insiders investigates whether it would be economically viable for large lithium-ion batteries to store electricity generated from wind and large PV sources. A number of projects using this type of application are currently proposed in the National Electricity Market (NEM). If they are viable, it will mean that renewable energy can improve market efficiency and the overall reliability of the electricity system.

To read this article, please download the PDF version from the link below.

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25 Aug 2016

Insider 24: Can the National Electricity Market achieve 50% renewables?

In this edition of IES Insider, we assess how a 50% renewable energy target by 2030 would impact the National Electricity Market (NEM). We carried out wholesale market modelling to project changes to the mix of generation sources and future wholesale prices, as well as the impacts on consumers.

Insider 24: Can the National Electricity Market achieve 50% renewables?

In this edition of IES Insider, we assess how a 50% renewable energy target by 2030 would impact the National Electricity Market (NEM). We carried out wholesale market modelling to project changes to the mix of generation sources and future wholesale prices, as well as the impacts on consumers.

Our modelled target is introduced in 2017 and increases to 50% by 2030. The target applies to all generated energy (including rooftop PV) in the NEM and not separately to each state. While we haven’t modelled the Queensland and Victorian schemes individually, we provide the results of the renewables take up for these regions if a 50% scheme were to be applied across the NEM.

To read this article, please download the PDF version from the link below.

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